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Deprivation and Prosperity   Download this section

The Indices of Multiple Deprivation measure shows that York is the 3rd least deprived city (out of the 64 cities of similar size in the UK). 

However, York has one Lower Level Super Output Area in the 10% most deprived areas in the country (found in Westfield Ward) and a further 7 areas in the 20% most deprived areas in the country (found in Westfield, Clifton, Hull Road, Heworth and Guildhall wards). York’s overall prosperity masks these pockets of deprivation.

A Lower Level Super Output Area is an area whose boundary is set by Office for National Statistics and contains between 1,000 - 3,000 people and between 400 - 1,200 households.

The map below shows the levels of deprivation in the York local authority boundary and is based on Index of Multiple Deprivation 2010 (IMD 2010) scores. These combine a number of indicators, chosen to cover a range of economic, social and housing issues, into a single deprivation score for each small area in England. It shows some detailed information about the levels of deprivation in York. This is based on Indices of Multiple Deprivation scores. 

In this map, the blue shading shows the areas within each ward that have the highest levels of deprivation. The black areas represent the least deprived areas within York. 

Indices Of Multiple Deprivation

Average earnings in York are higher than the regional and national averages; however a growing wage gap between the average and the lowest earners is apparent.

Pay Gap Between the Average and Lowest 25% of Earners in Full Time Employment: York 2002 to 2012

 

Employee jobs (2012)

 

York
(employee jobs)

York
(%)

Yorkshire and The Humber
(%)

Great Britain
(%)

Total employee jobs

100,300

-

-

-

Full-time

64,500

64.4

66.5

67.2

Part-time

35,700

35.6

33.5

32.8

Employee jobs by industry

Primary Services (A-B: agriculture and mining)

0

0.0

0.2

0.3

Energy and Water (D-E)

500

0.5

1.1

1.1

Manufacturing (C)

4,000

4.0

11.7

8.7

Construction (F)

3,700

3.7

4.7

4.5

Services (G-S)

92,000

91.7

82.2

85.5

Wholesale and retail, including motor trades (G)

15,500

15.5

15.7

16.1

Transport storage (H)

9,100

9.1

5.0

4.6

Accommodation and food services(I)

9,400

9.3

6.0

6.9

Information and communication (J)

2,600

2.6

2.8

3.9

Financial and other business services(K-N)

18,600

18.6

17.9

21.5

Public admin, education and health (O-Q)

31,900

31.9

30.6

28.1

Other Services (R-S)

4,800

4.8

4.2

4.5

Source:  NOMIS

Whilst full-time weekly wages in York for all employees are higher than both regional and national averages overall, weekly wages for women are lower by almost £40 per week when compared to earnings of other women across the country.

Earnings by Workplace 2013
  York Yorkshire and The Humber Great Britain
(pounds) (pounds) (pounds)
Gross weekly pay
Full-time workers 527 479.1 517.8
Male full-time workers 558.5 517.5 558.3
Female full-time workers 420.7 416.3 459.6
Hourly pay
Full-time workers 13.11 12 13.17
Male full-time workers 14.19 12.5 13.8
Female full-time workers 11.25 11.15 12.27
Source:  NOMIS

Weekly wages for male workers are comparable to earnings of other males across the country.

Weekly wages for both male and female workers are greater than earnings for male and female workers in the Yorkshire and Humber region.

The difference is earnings between men and women in York equates to men earning £2.94 more per hour than women.

With part-time employment levels higher than both regional and national averages this lowers the average weekly earning figures for people employed in York. 

York resident’s disposable household income is deviating further from the national trend and further than many comparator economies. This means that disposable income available to a resident in York is decreasing. Disposable household income in York has consistently reduced since 2002.

Disposable Household Income: York. 1997 to 2011

Disposable Household Income: York vs other cities. 1997 to 2011.

 

In Work Poverty

http://www.jrf.org.uk/slideshow/mpse2013

A Joseph Rowntree Foundation report titled: Monitoring Poverty and Social Exclusion 2013 reports against a number of measures for poverty across the country and highlights the following key points:

  • In 2011-2012, 13 million people in the UK were living in poverty. For the first time more than half of these people lived in a working family.
  • The proportion of pensioners in poverty is at its lowest for almost 30 years.
  • The proportion of working-age adults without children in poverty is the highest on record.
  • Average incomes have fallen by 8% since their peak in 2008. As a result, around 2 million people have a household income below the 2008 poverty line but are not considered to be in poverty today.
  • In the last year, the labour market has shown signs of revival. Underemployment has fallen slightly from 6.4 million to 6.3 million and young adult unemployment appears to have peaked at 21%.
  • The number of people in low paid jobs has risen. There are now around 5 million people paid below the living wage.
  • The movement in and out of work is substantial – 4.8 million different people have claimed Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA) in the last two years.
  • Following recent changes to the social security system, many people on means-tested benefits have reduced incomes. Around 500,000 families face a cut in housing benefit via the under-occupation penalty and a reduction in Council Tax Benefit. The number of sanctioned jobseekers with a reduced entitlement to JSA doubled in 2010 to around 800,000.
  • The level of benefits for an out-of-work adult without children now covers only 40% of what the public considers to be a minimum standard of living. For families with children this figure is no more than 60%.
  • National averages mask huge variations between areas in unemployment, educational achievement, and life expectancy.

The extent and impact of in-work poverty in York should be more fully understood.

More information about poverty, including fuel poverty is contained within the poverty section and can be found here.

References

This page was last updated on 20 April 2015
This page will be reviewed by 20 April 2016