Jsna Banner

Where Do People Live in York?   Download this section

Each of York’s 22 wards has a ward profile which contains a wide range of information at ward level such as ward population by age, gender, ethnicity, life expectancy, employment status, occupation, hours worked, qualifications, benefit claims, housing status, household composition, religious beliefs, health and wellbeing, crime, anti-social behaviour and community groups.

Due to the amount of information contained in each profile, this section does not contain the full profiles for each ward. Profiles are available here.

The following figures show some further population breakdown by ward area within York. The most densely populated areas are in the north and west of the city.

 

York Population by Ward

 York Population By Ward

2012 Population Estimates (Source: 2011 Census)

 

Each year, population growth is estimated by the Office for National Statistics and is based on a range of factors which include fertility rates and mortality rates.

Population estimate data available at ward level in York show significant variances from the 2011 Census including:

  • 65 year olds increased by 35% (+678)

  • 18 year olds decreased by 11% (-325)

  • 39 year olds decreased by 10% (-292)

  • 5 year olds increased by 10% (+202)

Overall, the data shows the predominant population changes in wards to the east of the city (Derwent, Heslington, Hull Road, Osbaldwick) which have increasing numbers of 20-24 year olds (studying at the city’s universities).

Of particular note is the decreasing number of 30-39 year olds since 2001.

 

Percentage of population by age bands for each ward

Source 2011 Census

From analysis of population change between the 2011 census population data and the 2012 mid year population estimates available for local ward areas, the following table shows the key points given for each age band:

 

Significant changes in population by ward by 5 year age band since the 2011 Census

Age band

Population changes to note between 2011 Census data and 2012 mid-year Office for National Statistics data

0-4 year olds Fulford has seen an increase of 13.8% (140 from 123)Guildhall has increased by 10.8% (358 from 323)
  • This might have implications for the availability of childcare and school places in these wards.
5-9 year olds  Heworth has seen an increase of 11.1% (731 from 658)Micklegate has increased by 11.8% (576 from 515)
10-14 year olds  There has been no significant variance since 2011There has been a decrease in the overall number within this age group across York of -3.0% (9,423 from 9,712)
15-19 year olds  Fishergate has seen a decrease of 18.8% (572 from 704)Heslington has decreased by 10.4% (2043 from 2281)Heworth Without has decreased by 19.1% (646 from 801)

20-24 year olds 

The following wards have all seen  increases in this age group:

  • Derwent 13.3% (145 from 128)

  • Fulford 13.3% (213 from 188)

  • Heslington 14.2% (1,606 from 1,406)

  • Heworth Without 11.8% (133 from 119)

  • Hull Road 13.5% (3,612 from 3,182)

  • Osbaldwick 25.8% (439 from 349)

25-29 year olds

 

Heslington has seen an increase of 18.2% ( 247 from 209)

Huntington and New Earswick has increased by 11.3% (698 from 627)

30-34 year olds  Fishergate has seen an increase of 16.3% (826 from 710)Guildhall has increased by 14.4% (801 from 700)
35-39 year olds  Overall the population of this age group across the whole of York has decreased by 4.7%Derwent has seen a decrease of 12.8% (157 from 180)Wheldrake has decreased by 14.7% (250 from 293)
40-44 year olds  There has been no significant variance since 2011There has been a decrease in the overall number within this age group across York of -3.0% (13,708 from 13,756)
45-49 year olds Guildhall has seen an increase of 10.3% (516 from 468)
50-54 year olds  Osbaldwick has seen an increase of 17% (268 from 229)Strensall has increased by 13.6% (633 from 557)
55-59 year olds  There has been no significant variance since 2011There has been an increase in the overall number within this age group across York of 1.6% (10,821 from 10,649)
60-64 year olds Derwent has seen a decrease of 16% (262 from 312)Osbaldwick has decreased by 13.2% (190 from 219)Heworth Without has seen a decrease of 11.9% (282 from 320)Huntington and New Earswick has decreased by 11.8% (769 from 872)
65-69 year olds  Across York since 2011 this group has increased by 12.4%The following wards have all seen  increases in this age group:
  • Bishopthorpe 11.9% (329 from 294)
  • Clifton 15.0% (537 from 467)
  • Derwent 11.5% (262 from 304)
  • Dringhouses and Woodthorpe 13.4% (730 from 644)
  • Haxby and Wigginton 12.5% (927 from 824)
  • Heworth 17.9% (487 from 413)
  • Heworth Without 10.3% (342 from 310)
  • Huntington and New Earswick 15.5% (889 from 770)
  • Micklegate 14.9% (508 from 442)
  • Rural West York 15.6% (728 from 630)
  • Strensall 14% (463 from 406)
  • Westfield 16.8% (618 from 529)
70-74 year olds There has been no significant variance since 2011There has been a decrease in the overall number within this age group across York of -0.8% (7,743 from 7,807)
75-79 year olds  The following wards have all seen significant increases in this age group:
  • Derwent 10.1% (208 from 189)
  • Guildhall 10.7% (207 from 187)
  • Heworth Without 11% (253 from 228)
  • Strensall 14.8% (279 from 243)
80-84 year olds  There has been no significant variance since 2011 There has been a decrease in the overall number within this age group across York of -0.3% (5,024 from 5,040)
85-89 year olds Strensall has seen an increase of 20.5% for this age group (141 from 117)
90+ year olds Across York since 2011 this group has increased by 8.6% (1,799 from 1,657)

Sources:

Office for National Statistics: 2011 Census: population and household estimates for Wards and Output Areas in England and Wales. www.ons.gov.uk

Office for National Statistics: Mid-2012 Population Estimates for 2012 Wards in England and Wales by Single Year of Age and Sex. www.ons.gov.uk

Source: ONS 2012 Population estimate

 

Population Change By 5 Year Age Band

 

Population Projections

In line with national trends, projected populations show an expected increase in older aged people due to a general increase in life expectancy.

Population projections from the Office for National Statistics show that:

  • By 2020, the over 65 population in York is expected to increase by 5,300 (15%) including an additional 1,200 people aged over 85 (a 24% increase).

 

  • By 2030, the over 65 population in York is expected to increase by 13,700 (40%) including an additional 3,600 people aged over 85 (a 72% increase).

 

  • By 2037, the over 65 population in York is expected to increase by 19,400 (55%) including an additional 6,600 people aged over 85 (a 132% increase).

The chapter about What it's like to live in York gives greater detail about plans for development of housing and population growth in York (York Local Plan).

 

Population projections by age

Population Projections By Age

The large population spike for people aged 18 – 21 is likely to be caused by an incoming student population who then traditionally move away after completing their studies.

 

Migration

90.8% of York’s population were born in the UK, 2.7% in other EU countries and 5.5% outside the EU.

3,678 people arrived in York between 2010 to 2011 - 1.9% of the population - more than double the regional figure of 0.8%.

Heslington ranks within the highest 7% of wards nationally for number of residents born outside the UK (Office for National Statistics, 2011).

 

Births and Deaths

There were 2,095 live births in York in 2012. Mid year population estimates for 2012 based on the 2011 Census show that York has a general birth rate of 47.9 (births per 1,000 women aged 15-44). This is lower than regional and national birth rates of 64.2 for Yorkshire and the Humber and 64.8 for England and Wales.

York’s total fertility rate is 1.5 (lowest in the Yorkshire & Humber region). This figure represents the number of children that a woman would give birth to throughout her child bearing life. This is based on average age specific fertility rates. This compares to 1.94 for Yorkshire and the Humber and 1.94 for England and Wales.

 

How People Live

According to the 2011 Census, York’s population was 198,051 persons in 2011 and was made up of 83,552 households.

York has 25,224 households with people living on their own, with a lower proportion who are aged 65 and over living on their own than in 2001. This equates to 10,803 single pensioner households. In 2001, there were 11,687 single pensioner households.

This differs to national trends where single person households for people aged 65 and over have increased by 8%. An England wide summary of household composition is available on the Office for National Statistics website.

However, there is one ward (Heworth Without) in York which ranks in the highest 5% of wards nationally for one person households aged over 65.

York has a higher proportion of people aged under 65 living on their own than in 2001.

In 2001, there were 11,687 single person households of people aged over 65 years old and 11,842 single person households of people aged under 65 years of age.

In 2011, this reduced to 10,803 people aged 65 or over living alone but increased to 14,442 for people aged under 65 who were living alone.

Loneliness is not just an older person’s issue. Chronic loneliness can have health and wellbeing consequences. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF) is currently running a programme - Neighbourhood Approaches to Loneliness. It is important that we learn from this and work with them to prevent loneliness across the entire population.

 

Change in Household composition in York: 2001 to 2011

Household Composition

 

Worklessness

A workless household is one where no adult in the household works.

Office for National Statistics data on workless households show that the percentage of workless households in York has fallen to 13.2% (Jan-Dec 2012) from 14.9% (Jan-Dec 2011). This compares to 18.1% for England and Wales and 19.2% for Yorkshire and the Humber.

Office for National Statistics data on children living in workless households show that York has a lower percentage of children in workless households, at 6.1%, than nationally or regionally at 14.9% and 16.9% respectively.

 

Housing and Home Ownership

This Office for National Statistics infographic shows changes in home ownership and renting over the century, in England and Wales. There is a focus on changes in ownership and renting over the decade to 2011, where home ownership fell for the first time since 1918.

A century of home ownership and renting infographic

Infographic by Office for National Statistics (ONS)

Within York, the percentage of those who own their own home with a mortgage has fallen to 32.2% from 40.3% and the percentage in private rented accommodation has doubled from 8.7% to 16.4%.

This is similar to the national picture where 32.7% of people in England & Wales own their own home with a mortgage and 15.6% of people privately rent.

A range of detailed information on home ownership and household composition can be found on the Office for National Statistics site at http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/census/2011-census/detailed-characteristics-on-housing-for-local-authorities-in-england-and-wales/index.html

 

Tenure by Household Composition in York

Household Composition

All categories: Tenure

Owned: Total

Owned outright

Owned with a mortgage or loan

Shared ownership (part owned and part rented)

All categories: Household composition

83,552

55,227

28,351

26,876 631

One person household: Total

25,224

15,419

10,524

4,895 276

One person household: Aged 65 and over

10,803

7,751

7,224

527 137

One person household: Other

14,421

7,668

3,300

4,368 139

One family only: Total

50,873

37,241

16,811

20,430 284

One family only: All aged 65 and over

7,373

6,655

6,218

437 44

One family only: Married or same-sex civil partnership couple: Total

27,039

22,541

8,314

14,227 122

One family only: Cohabiting couple: Total

9,173

4,706

949

3,757 60

Other household types: Total

7,455

2,567

1,016

1,551 71

Source: Office for National Statistics. 2011 Census, Detailed Characteristics on Housing for Local Authorities in England and Wales. Tenure by Household Composition. Available at: http://www.nomisweb.co.uk/census/2011/DC4101EW

Factors identified as contributing to a reduction in home ownership rates are that house prices have increased at a higher rate in recent years than before; that prices have increased at rates higher than wage increases and that lending requirements have become tighter in recent years (ONS, 2013).

http://www.yorkpress.co.uk/archive/2014/02/11/11000548.Young__give_up_on_home_owner_dream_/

Guildhall ward has 43% of households that privately rent which is in the top 2% of wards nationally. Westfield ward has 32% of households that socially rent which is in the top 10% of wards nationally. Westfield ward is also ranked in the top 13% of wards nationally for households which are short of 1 bedroom.

 

Rental Status by Household Composition

Household Composition Social rented: Total Rented from council (Local Authority) Other social rented Private rented: Total Private landlord or letting agency Other private rented Living rent free
All categories: Household composition 11,679 7,381 4,298

14,980

13,687

1,293

1,035

One person household: Total

5,056 3,201 1,855 3,932 3,617 315 541

One person household: Aged 65 and over

2,262 1,343 919 352 274 78 301

One person household: Other

2,794 1,858 936 3,580 3,343 237 240

One family only: Total

5,988 3,759 2,229 6,950 6,192 758 410

One family only: All aged 65 and over

499

261

238

115

86

29

60

One family only: Married or same-sex civil partnership couple: Total

1,832

1,111

721

2,374

1,985

389

170

One family only: Cohabiting couple: Total

1,298 824 474 3,034 2,817 217 75

Other household types: Total

635 421 214 4,098 3,878 220 84

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Office for National Statistics. 2011 Census, Detailed Characteristics on Housing for Local Authorities in England and Wales. Tenure by Household Composition. Available at: http://www.nomisweb.co.uk/census/2011/DC4101EW

The relationship between poor housing and ill health is a complicated one involving many different factors. Evidence suggests that living in poor housing can lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular and respiratory disease as well as to anxiety and depression. Problems such as damp, mould, excess cold and structural defects which increase the risk of an accident and also present hazards to health.

References

This page was last updated on 07 July 2015
This page will be reviewed by 07 July 2016