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Mental Health   Download this section

Mental Health

This section covers anyone who experiences mental ill health or who is affected by its impacts. Over the course of a lifetime this is pretty much everyone.

 

Areas where York is doing well

Employment

The majority of  adults with mental health conditions are able to work; this is particularly true where that mental health condition is being treated and managed appropriately. York has a lower proportion of adults who receive Employment Support Allowance because they are unable to work due to mental ill health than the national average. This has been consistently true for at least the last five years.

Caring for people with dementia

By caring for a family member, friend, or neighbour, unpaid carers provide significant support that can be difficult to replace or replicate through social care services. However, being a carer can be a demanding role and can impact substantially on a person's life and health. It is therefore important that we work to support carers and protect their health. Carers of people with dementia in York report a better quality of life than their peers nationally and also their peers who live in York's statistical neighbour areas. This indicator has only been measured once, and so trend data is not available.

Social care users

Everyone deserves good mental health, but some people,  such as people who use social care services, are at greater risk of poor mental health. However, residents in York who use adult social care services have significantly less anxiety and depression than their peers nationally, and the lowest level of anxiety and depression of any of their peer groups in York's statistical neighbour areas. This indicator has not been recently updated and so the information may no longer be an accurate reflection of York.

Self reported happiness

Self reported measures are a good way of assessing the wellbeing of the general York population, not just people who are in contact with services. More people in York report moderate or high levels of happiness than their peers nationally, regionally, and against York's statistical neighbours. This is a fairly stable trend; over the last five years York has tended to be similar to slightly better than the national average.

 

Areas where York needs to improve

Dementia diagnosis

Accurate diagnosis of dementia is the first step to getting help and support. York has a lower proportion of people aged over 65 years with a diagnosis of dementia in comparison to the national and regional averages, as well as the tendency of York's statistical neighbours. This means that there is likely to be a larger proportion of adults in York who have dementia but do not have a diagnosis. As this is a relatively new indicator, clear trend data is not yet available.

Suicide

Suicide is an indicator of the prevalence of unmanaged serious mental illness. York has a higher proportion of deaths that are attributed to suicide than the national and regional averages, and also the tendency of York's statistical neighbours. Across the last decade, York has been similar to the national average; however in the most recent reporting period the suicide rate in York is shown to have risen and is now substantially higher than the national average.

Children and young people

Overall, the data for York shows that there are a large proportion of children who are unwell with a mental health condition. The proportion of young people from York who are admitted to hospital for a mental health condition or as a result of self harm is substantially higher than elsewhere in the country and has increased dramatically in the last year. Additionally, the number of new cases of depression in young people is higher in York than the national average; this suggests that the proportion of young people with a diagnosis of depression may continue to rise in the coming years.

Self-harm

Admissions to hospital as a result of self-harm injuries is a proxy measure for serious self harm injuries. It is recognised that there will be many more self-harm incidents which go unrecorded. However, it remains an important indicator of population mental health. York has a higher proportion of residents who are admitted to hospital as a result of self-harm injuries than the national average as well as the majority of York's statistical neighbours.

Self-reported anxiety

Self-reported measures are a good way of assessing the wellbeing of the general York population, not just people who are in contact with services. More people in York report higher levels of anxiety than the national average. York also has substantially more people who report higher levels of anxiety than people who live in York's statistical neighbour areas. Self reported anxiety in York has raised in the last two years and this has caused York to rise above the national average.

 

Areas of particular inequality in York

Accommodation

Among adults in York who use secondary mental health services, only a small number live in 'stable and appropriate' accommodation. This proportion is substantially lower than the region and most of York's statistical neighbour areas. Until 2013/14 the proportion of adults found to be living in stable and appropriate accommodation was similar to or better than the national average, however this has dropped off steeply in the last two years. This may be due to a reporting issue, and may not reflect the actual provision in York. This is being investigated.

Homelessness

Homelessness and mental health are intertwined issues. In 2016/2017 well over half of people who were referred to York homelessness services through the single point of access scheme were judged to have a mental health vulnerability by the professional making the referral.

 

Other important health areas

Psychological therapy

Referrals to the 'improving access to psychological therapy' (IAPT) programme in the Vale of York are consistently lower than the England average, and also lower than the majority of CCG areas judged to be most similar to Vale of York. These figures should be considered in combination with the estimated level of need for mental health services in York and surrounding areas.

Deaths of people with dementia

In the majority of cases, it is not dementia that causes a person's death; instead it is other factors relating to physical health. Therefore the rate of death for people with dementia is a proxy indicator for the quality of care and medical attention they receive. York has a similar rate of death for people with dementia aged over 65 as the England average.

 

 

 

 

This page was last updated on 08 November 2017
This page will be reviewed by 08 November 2018